Currency in Norway, Norwegian Money, Krona, Bankers, Economy, Diapersonaplane, Diapers on a plane, creating family memories, family travel

Holy crap is Norway expensive. It’s probably the most expensive place we’ve ever been to and not because of the activities we participated in but because everything is so ridiculously overpriced. And when I say ridiculously, I mean this trip legitimately broke us.

The currency in Norway is the Norwegian Krone. It’s another one of those crown currencies. The current value is eight krone to one US dollar, so don’t go to Norway expecting to get a bang for your buck. Officially the currency in Norway is marked as NOK, but price tags typically reflect the kr symbol. The two marks are interchangeable. All establishments accept credit cards, but you’ll want to inquire before hand if you can use foreign currency.

Currency in Norway, Norwegian Money, Krona, Bankers, Economy, Diapersonaplane, Diapers on a plane, creating family memories, family travel
7/11 equivalent in Norway

First off, it’s going to cost you at least $75 minimum for a mildly decent meal, just for the food. Entrees start at $25 a plate, regardless of the establishment, and then you’ll have to add on an additional 25% tax. All food, from restaurants to grocery stores, is taxed at 25%. That $75 meal just came out to $100. Minimum.

Activities in Norway are unique and ones you won’t want to skip during your trip, which makes Norway more expensive by default. The currency in Norway isn’t necessarily to blame for this, but it’s important to note when planning your budget that this isn’t a place where you can spend time exploring on your own, or seeking out small and hidden treasures without feeling like you missed out. You’ll want to go dog sledding, chasing the Northern lights, snowmobiling, ice crabbing, and we highly recommend a Hurtigruten cruise. These unforgettable activities come with a hefty price tag, but the memory of the event will long supersede what you paid for it.

Currency in Norway, Norwegian Money, Krona, Bankers, Economy, Diapersonaplane, Diapers on a plane, creating family memories, family travel
Playing with the dogs during after our sledding adventure

On the flip side, children in Norway are practically free until 18. You’ll have to pay for their exorbitantly priced and taxed food, but there is no charge for kids on public transportation or in hotels, and they are heavily discounted on all activities.

There isn’t much to say about currency in Norway, but the best advice we can offer for planning your family budget is to save, save, save and plan on spending even more.

Check out all of our fun activities in Norway from Oslo to Tromsø to Kirkenes.

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